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Upcoming Forum on Renewable Energy In Kentucky

by Lisa Abbott — last modified Nov 05, 2010 10:40 AM
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KySEA members and other interested individuals are encouraged to register for a one day conference about the opportunities
for job creation in Kentucky through renewable energy.

The forum will take place on Wednesday, November 17 at the Berea College Alumni Building in Berea,Kentucky from 9 am to 3:30 pm.

The event is sponsored by the Kentucky Pollution Prevention Center, the Tennessee and Eastern Kentucky Wind Working Group, the Southern Alliance for Clean Energy, the Kentucky Department for Energy Development and Independence, and Energizing Kentucky (a collaboration among four Kentucky colleges and universities).


According to conference publicity, the program will explore:

* Economic Drivers for Renewable Energy

* Opportunities to develop Kentucky's workforce to meet the industry's current and future employment needs

* Funding and investment opportunities that a clean energy economy might provide

* Challenges for businesses, utilities and consumers


There is a registration fee of $15 that will cover a light breakfast and lunch.

Any questions about this event may be directed to 502-852-0965.

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