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Why did you join KySEA?
Kentuckians For The Commonwealth Kentuckians For The Commonwealth

"KFTC members are excited to be part of this alliance because we understand that Kentucky must begin to transition towards a clean energy future. For years we’ve worked to address the problems that stem from Kentucky’s dependence on coal, including harm to our air, water, land and people. Being a part of KySEA is a way to work on the solutions to Kentucky’s environmental, economic, and energy challenges. Together we can build new power in Kentucky!"

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Erik Hungerbuhler

Feb 02, 2018

Clean Energy Information

by Erik Hungerbuhler — last modified Feb 02, 2018 11:35 PM

We will be posting topical videos in this space relating to clean energy policy. Stand by for updates.

 

 

 

May 09, 2014

General Assembly 2014 Wrap-Up

by Erik Hungerbuhler — last modified May 09, 2014 12:09 PM
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The 2014 Kentucky General Assembly wrapped up on April 15, and KYSEA is proud to report that we had an excellent session building support, mobilizing citizen lobbyists and advancing the conversation around clean energy in Kentucky. Though our first attempt at a Lobby Day was snowed out, several folks were able to safely make it to Frankfort and held many positive meetings with legislators. This momentum kept going during our rescheduled lobby day on February 26 in support of our bill, the Clean Energy Opportunity Act, sponsored by Rep. Mary Lou Marzian. Between the two lobby days, nearly 40 KYSEA representatives spoke with 44 legislators and received more support than we ever have in the past. The jobs and economic opportunities in clean energy, particularly energy efficiency, are gaining traction.

The information-only hearing on our bill was held on March 6 before the House Tourism Development and Energy Committee.  Chairman Keith Hall gave us nearly the entire hearing to testify on what this bill will bring to Kentucky. Afterwards, Rep. Hall spoke with us at length about how important energy efficiency is to his constituents in Eastern Kentucky.

Thanks to everyone who lobbied hard for this bill and helped to make our hearing so successful. We know that next year will be even better!

There were several other energy-related bills that KYSEA tracked during the session.

In the House:

  • HB 52: Would require nuclear power plants only to have a plan for storage of nuclear waste, not a way to permanently dispose of it. Did not receive a hearing.
  • HB 63: Would require a 30-day supply of fuel on-site for power plants. Since it’s difficult to store natural gas on-site, this was a bill to support the coal industry. It received a hearing but no vote.
  • HB 291: Increases public participation and clarifies setbacks for the siting of electric facilities. Became law.
  • HB 388: Allows the Kentucky Energy and Environment Cabinet to set emissions reductions standards for coal-fired power plants, rather than the federal EPA. Became law.
    Note: This was a “just-for-show” bill because state law cannot supersede federal law.
  • HB404: Would establish a structure for Property Assessed Clean Energy projects, which allows for commercial retrofits to be paid back through property taxes. Passed the House but did not receive a hearing in the Senate.
  • HB535: Would raise the net metering limit from 30kW to 500kW. Did not receive a hearing.
  • HB489: Would allow smaller Energy Services Companies (ESCOs) to participate in state projects. Did not receive a hearing.
  • HB573: Essentially would require the Public Service Commission to review the proposal to close of the Big Sandy coal-fired power plant. Passed out of Committee but did not receive a hearing on the House floor.

In the Senate:

  • SB67: Would require nuclear power plants only to have a plan for storage of nuclear waste, not a way to permanently dispose of it. Passed in the Senate but did not receive a hearing in the House.
  • SB153: Allows for use of state pollution prevention funds as a match for federal funds to provide technical assistance for energy efficiency projects.  Became law.

We are excited for the opportunities the next legislative session will bring. As always, we invite you to get involved with KYSEA and share your thoughts and ideas for bringing clean energy policy to Kentucky.

Jan 22, 2014

2014 Clean Energy Lobby Day

by Erik Hungerbuhler — last modified Jan 22, 2014 05:00 PM
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Capitol Solar Install

Your voice is needed to make the case for clean energy policies in Kentucky that can generate thousands of good new jobs and help our families and businesses save money by saving energy.

HB 195, sponsored by Rep. Mary Lou Marzian, is a practical and powerful way to jumpstart investments in energy efficiency and renewable energy across our Commonwealth. The bill is modeled on policies already working well and creating jobs in places like Ohio and North Carolina, along with about 30 other states. With a slumping economy and energy bills running high, Kentuckians are looking for meaningful solutions. HB 195 would generate about 28,000 net new jobs in the Commonwealth over the next decade. Ten years from now, average electric bills in Kentucky are projected to be 8-10% lower under this bill than under a “business as usual” scenario.

Join with members of the Kentucky Sustainable Energy Alliance for a Clean Energy Lobby Day in Frankfort on Wednesday, February 26, 2014. 

Let us know if you plan to attend by registering today!

Here’s a brief run down of our schedule on February 5th:

  • Meet in Room 125 of the Capitol annex in Frankfort from 9 am to 11:45 am, we will then switch to Room 129 (next door) from 11:45 am-1 pm. 

  • Talk with lawmakers between 9 am and 1 pm.

  • Reconvene in Room 129 of the Capitol Annex from 2 to 4 pm for a coalition meeting of the KY Sustainable Energy Alliance.

We will offer a webinar on Monday, February 3rd at 7 pm EST/6 pm CST to review key information about the bill and the case for clean energy policies in Kentucky. Here’s how to join that call:

  • To view the slide show, go to www.readytalk.com. Then enter access code: 8931147.

  • To join the phone call, dial 866-740-1260 and then enter access Code: 8931147.

We will try to schedule as many appointments as possible with legislators on February 26th. And we will do our best to match you with any meetings that are scheduled with legislators from your region. However, if you have a good relationship with specific legislators, it’s a good idea for you to reach out to them yourself to set up an appointment. Please do let us know if you’ve confirmed a meeting so that we don’t duplicate efforts. You can send any related updates to Carrie@kysea.org or lisa@kysea.org.

Can't make it to Frankfort?

Of course, if you can’t make it to Frankfort on February 26th, you can still make your voice heard by calling or emailing your legislators and asking them to support HB 195. The toll-free message line to all legislators is 1-800-372-7181. You can also send an email message to any legislator through this website: http://www.lrc.ky.gov/Legislators.htm

Feel free to contact lisa@kysea.org with questions or updates.

We look forward to seeing you in Frankfort.

Jun 10, 2011

Louisville business supports clean energy solutions

by Erik Hungerbuhler — last modified Jun 10, 2011 12:54 PM
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KYGreenTV recently interviewed Jeff Auxier, Secretary of the Kentucky Solar Energy Society on the roof of Patrick O'Shea's restaurant in Louisville to show off the restaurant's new solar water heater system and to talk about KySEA's efforts to pass clean energy legislation n Frankfort.

Part 1

Part 2

Sep 01, 2010

KySEA’s Voice Heard in Climate Action Plan Council Controversy

by Erik Hungerbuhler — last modified Sep 01, 2010 03:25 PM

The Kentucky Climate Action Plan Council is an advisory group representing “academia, agriculture, business, forestry, industry, environmental groups and many levels of government”, convened in December 2009 for the purposes of “collectively developing an action plan to address the causes of climate change, prepare for the likely consequences and impacts of climate change to Kentucky, and establish firm benchmarks and timetables for implementing the KCAPC recommendations.”  The Council has met four times over the past several months, with each meeting open to the public.  In between full Council meetings, Technical Working Groups – also open to the public – have convened to allow for a detailed consideration and study of various policy options related to the Climate Action Plan.

The workings of both the Council and the Technical Working Groups have been regularly updated on the Council’s website.

However, in the dog days of August – 8 months into the Council’s process – the Government Contract Review Committee voted 6-0 (with one abstention) to disapprove the contract with the Center for Climate Strategies, the DC-based consulting firm hired to facilitate and support the Council’s processes.

KySEA members have participated throughout the Council’s process, some formally as members of the Council itself and others as active public participants.  While KySEA members expressed concerns early on regarding the transparency of the appointment process and representation of appointees, the dialogue that occurred during the Council meetings as well as the data being assembled with the support of the Center for Climate Strategies have been steps in the right direction for Kentucky.   Recognizing the importance of these nascent efforts,  KySEA members came together to encourage Governor Beshear’s administration to override the Contract Review Committee’s recommendation and continue with the contract to the Center for Climate Strategies.

We submitted this letter to Governor Beshear, Secretary Peters and Secretary Miller.  We were thrilled to hear that the Administration agreed on the need to maintain the climate conversation and continue assessing Kentucky’s potential impacts and opportunities.  Secretary Miller’s letter to the Committee, informing of the decision to retain the Center for Climate Strategies is available here.

KySEA members will continue to engage in the Climate Action Planning Council process and share learnings with all our members and supporters.

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Clean energy stories
Randy's run Randy's run

Clay County, Kentucky resident Randy Wilson ran for the board of his electric cooperative on a platform of affordable energy, better energy choices, and good local jobs in 2009. Randy was the first person to oppose a sitting Jackson Energy board member since the co-op was founded in 1938. Before running for office, Randy was an active member of the Kentuckians For the Commonwealth’s Canary Leadership Network carrying a message throughout the region about the need to transition away from coal and towards clean energy.

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