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Bluegrass GreenExpo is This Weekend! Oct. 30th & 31st

by Nancy Reinhart — last modified Oct 29, 2010 11:03 AM

The Bluegrass GreenExpo will be held this weekend! It is the largest collection of Green Products, Exhibits & Resources ever assembled in Kentucky.

When: Saturday, October 30, 10am - 6pm
 and Sunday, October 31, 12pm - 6pm

Where: Heritage Hall at Lexington Center

Cost: FREE!

It aims to connect the people of Kentucky with information and resources that will help us create more healthy, sustainable and prosperous communities, to connect businesses and organizations with similar goals to work together for the benefit of our communities and to connect state and community leaders with information and resources that can help them in making decisions that benefit Kentucky's people, communities and environment.

WENDELL BERRY headlines a panel discussion on coal & KY's energy future on Saturday 10/30 at 10:30 AM.

This panel will be followed at 12:15 by a set of songs by multi award-winning singer-songwriter Mitch Barrett. Mitch plays again Sunday 10/31 at 3 PM.

Other attractions include a trade show, workshops, activities for kids of all ages and renewable energy exhibitions and demos.

Several members of Kentucky Sustainable Energy Alliance, including ASPI and the Sierra Club will have tables at the expo with information about KySEA available.

 

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