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Register Soon for the Kentucky Habitat For Humanity Green Housing Conference

by Nancy Reinhart — last modified May 27, 2011 11:35 AM

WHAT: Green Housing Conference

WHEN: Monday June 13th and Tuesday June 14th

WHERE: Fayette County Extension Facility, 1140 Red Mile Place  in Lexington

COST: $25 for KySEA allies

Kentucky Habitat For Humanity, a member of the Kentucky Sustainable Energy Alliance, will host an amazing 2-day conference on green housing at the Fayette County Extension Facility in Lexington on June 13th and 14th. The special cost for KySEA allies is $25 for the two days, which includes all meals. Scholarships for travel costs and fees are also available.

The conference, entitled "Beginning With The End In Mind," will feature a wide range of speakers, including policy-makers and technical specialist from in and out of state. This conference focuses completely on the use of sustainable energy and green building techniques in ways that maintain housing affordability. As many know, Habitat For Humanity works successfully with thousands with low-income families each year to provide sustainable, affordable housing.  


Visit www.kyhfh.org or contact Ginger Watkins (ginger@kyhfh.org) to learn more or register for the event.

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