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Solar Powered Health: Rockcastle Regional State's First Solar Powered Hospital

by Kristin Tracz — last modified Jan 04, 2012 10:48 AM

Rockcastle Regional Hospital adds solar power to further commitment in creating a healthy community.

This entry is cross posted from the Appalachian Transition blog.

Business Lexington has a story today on Rockcastle Regional Hospital's new solar array.  It is a great example of a community institution taking advantage of clean energy opportunities in Kentucky--we hope to see other hospitals and community institutions following in the footsteps of Rockcastle Regional soon!

From BizLex:

Rockcastle Regional State's First Solar Powered Hospital

Mt. Vernon, Ky - Rockcastle Regional Hospital has become the first hospital in Kentucky to use the sun as a major energy source.

The hospital went live with a solar array on November 30, 2011, incorporating solar power into its energy management plan and reducing its reliance on the public power grid.

Rockcastle Regional Hospital CEO Stephen A. Estes said the investment fits into the hospital's mission of creating a healthy community.

 Rock Hosp pic

Facilities and Materials Management Director Gary Asher and CEO Stephen A. Estes with the new solar panels.

"We've built our organization on forward-thinking innovation. Now we've applied that mindset to energy management, and it creates a win-win for us and the community in the long term," Estes said. "As corporate citizens, we feel an obligation to conserve energy, and doing so frees more resources for patient care and wellness initiatives."

Discussions took place with several companies and Green Earth Solar of Knoxville, Tennessee was awarded the contract. Green Earth Solar was launched in 2006 and has completed dozens of solar projects including dairies, manufacturing facilities, restaurants, parks and residential areas. Rockcastle Regional is the company's first hospital project. 

Two hundred and ten solar modules have been installed on the roof of the hospital's Outpatient Services Center.  The modules will produce around 290 watts each (60.9 kW total) and will account for enough energy annually to power eight to ten homes.  Kentucky Utilities will purchase the power generated. 

The solar panels essentially will power the third floor of the Outpatient Services Center, which is a space that will be utilized for community wellness events.  The panels will also provide an educational experience for local students. 

Opening its doors in 1956, Rockcastle Regional Hospital & Respiratory Care Center is a not-for-profit community healthcare system that operates emergency, 26-bed inpatient acute beds and outpatient acute care programs, a 93-bed long-term care program for patients dependent upon mechanical ventilation and a medical office complex. For more information about the hospital, visit http://www.rockcastleregional.org

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