Why did you join KySEA?
Center for Environmental Education and Sustainability Center for Environmental Education and Sustainability

“Among the most important issues today are tackling climate change and transitioning rapidly to a new energy economy that is based on conservation, efficiency, and clean energy.  Our Center joined KySEA to be a part of a network of individuals and groups using their combined resources and voice to effect legislative change in Kentucky. We believe all citizens and the Commonwealth will benefit from a clean energy future that will strengthen the  economy, protect the environment, improve health, and create jobs.”  - Nancy Givens

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Clean Energy Opportunity Act

It is time for Kentucky to transition to clean, affordable and sustainable energy solutions.

For the last two years, Representative Marzian introduced the "Clean Energy Opportunity Act" into the Kentucky General Assembly. KySEA supports this bill, which contains measures that if enacted would:

  • Create more than 26,000 local jobs, putting people to work and getting our economy back on track

  • Curb energy costs for our families, farms and businesses

  • Improve Kentuckians' health and well-being

     

Watch this video overview of the Clean Energy Opportunity Act, originally offered as a webinar on January 19th, 2012.

For more info on key components of the Clean Energy Opportunity Act, see the following:

Under this bill, participating utilities include investor-owned utilities, electric cooperatives and some municipal utilities. Implementation costs of all bill measures are fully recoverable by participating utilities.

 Download a flyer about the bill here.

 

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Clean energy stories
Organizing for Clean Energy in Kentucky's Coal Fields Organizing for Clean Energy in Kentucky's Coal Fields

In the history of coal in America, Harlan County, Kentucky is legendary for its coal heritage, especially for the efforts of its people to organize for better living and working conditions. Labor unrest in the 1930s led to the county being referred to as “Bloody Harlan.” That same passion for progress and tradition of organizing continues today as Harlan County residents work to diversify their energy economy.

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